Roddy Williams – The Atheist Poet

Posts tagged “Rejection

Rejection

Thank you very much for submitting your work. After careful consideration, we have not found a suitable place for it in our upcoming issue.

We appreciate the opportunity to read your words, and we wish you the best of luck in placing your work elsewhere!

Best regards’

I have been going through one of those periods of acceptance drought. Despite submitting over a hundred poems here and there I have been getting relentless rejection of late. One does get hardened to this, although one cannot help a certain ennui setting in when one has opened yet another of these ‘Thank you for your recent submission but..’ emails.
After many years of this I am somewhat numb to rejection, seeing it for what it is. It’s not personal. There’s huge amount of stiff competition out there and I can at least console myself with over a hundred previous publications.
There’s a but though. Sometimes, just sometimes, it brings you down. It’s not helped by the fact that I suffer from recurrent depression during which times I look at my work and see only amateurish ramblings. I’m wise enough to my moods to now know that this is not the true picture and carry on regardless, knowing that at some point The Black Dog will trot off back to wherever it lives when it’s not visiting.
Having said that I have developed a cathartic process of envisioning myself, just for a few seconds, angrily shaking my fist in the general direction of the publishers in question and shouting ‘Bastards!’
It doesn’t half make me feel better, and no one need ever know… until now obviously. But I trust you. I know it won’t go any further.
Thankfully I had one acceptance very recently of four pieces which will appear next year in the marvellous ‘Obsessed with Pipework’.
The best thing to do is to send out more. I’ll enter the National Poetry competition and there’s half a dozen or more well known mags open for subs this month.
Onwards and upwards.

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Rejection

Rejection – in life as in poetry – is something with which we all have to learn to deal in our own ways. Inevitably one will take it personally for the short moment following the digestion of the rejection slip or e-mail.
‘This is clearly absurd,’ you must tell yourself. ‘These editors do not know you and have no grand scheme to destroy your rise to poetry stardom. Besides, many magazines operate an anonymous policy whereby the selector or selectors have no idea who the authors may be.’
That usually works. Sometimes the inner voice whines back.
‘But this one doesn’t. They must hate me for sending something completely inappropriate for their magazine.’
I have to think this through. Are there editors so consumed with irrational hate for their potential contributors that they will refuse to publish the good stuff when they receive it?
‘I guess it is possible,’ I reply, ‘but I find it hard to imagine that your work could have been worse than the greetings card love twaddle that all editors must have to deal with.’
Apologies if you are a writer of greetings card love twaddle. It’s a worthy profession and a noble craft but not the sort of thing you tend to submit to contemporary poetry magazines.
I suspect someone will now send me a link to popular quarterly journal The Tennessee Greetings Card Love Twaddle Review (submissions open). But I digress.
‘One also has to consider the high volume of submissions some magazines receive against the number of pieces they can actually publish. Rejection doesn’t necessarily mean your work is bad, just that there was some very stiff competition.’
The digital age has been a double-edged sword in this respect. Yes, we have a fresh continent of online magazines and print magazines who accept e-mail and Submittable submissions, but this has opened the way for anyone to submit anything they want at any time of the day or night to about 80% of the market without leaving the house.
People who spend all their time the house without a good excuse shouldn’t be submitting poetry. I feel this is a bad idea. But I digress.
Rejection is painful, but it is momentary, and not personal.
Move on.
Persevere.
Keep Writing.

My Latest Acceptance #poetry

Two rejections yesterday and one acceptance of a poem for the wonderful Ink, Sweat and Tears, undoubtedly one of the best online poetry magazines. That will be online around November hopefully.

Rejection – in life as in poetry – is something with which we all have to learn to deal in our own ways. Inevitably one will take it personally for the short moment after one has digested the rejection slip or e-mail.

‘This is clearly absurd,’ you must tell yourself. ‘These editors do not know you and have no grand scheme to destroy your rise to poetry stardom. Besides, many magazines operate an anonymous policy whereby the selector or selectors have no idea who the authors may be.’
That usually works. Sometimes the inner voice whines back.
‘But this one doesn’t. They must hate me for sending something completely inappropriate for their magazine.’
I have to think this through. Are there editors so consumed with irrational hate for their potential contributors that they will refuse to publish the good stuff when they send it in?
‘I guess it is possible,’ I reply, ‘but I find it hard to imagine that your work could have been worse than the greetings card love twaddle that all editors must have to deal with.’
Apologies if you are a writer of greetings card love twaddle. It’s a worthy profession and a noble craft but not the sort of thing you tend to submit to contemporary poetry magazines.
I suspect someone will now send me a link to the popular quarterly journal Tennessee Greetings Card Love Twaddle (submissions open). But I digress.
‘One also has to consider the high volume of submissions some magazines receive against the number of pieces they can actually publish. Rejection doesn’t necessarily mean your work is bad, just that there was some very stiff competition.’
The digital age has been a double-edged sword in this respect. Yes, we have a fresh continent of online magazines and print magazines who accept e-mail and Submittable submissions, but this has opened the way for anyone to submit anything they want at any time of the day or night to about 80% of the market without leaving the house.
People who don’t leave the house without a good excuse shouldn’t be submitting poetry. I feel this is a bad idea. But I digress.
Rejection is painful, but it is momentary. Move on. Persevere.